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Vintage Autos Take Center Stage October 7 & 8

(Goldendale, Wash., September 11, 2017) — Celebrate Sam Hill’s love of roads October 7 & 8 during Car is King Weekend, a free two-day event featuring a classic car show, an open drive on the historic Maryhill Loops Road and a timed hill climb with vintage sports cars.  All activities are free on the grounds of Maryhill Museum of Art and at the historic Maryhill Loops Road.

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2017

Concours de Maryhill | 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Classic car show; anyone can enter.  The day concludes with an awards presentation. Organized by Goldendale Motorsports Association. Free on museum grounds for spectators. Want to enter your car? Click here for more information.

Vintage Race Car Display | noon to 2 p.m. 
Members of the Maryhill Loops Vintage Hillclimb Association will have a range of vintage race cars on site.

Drive the Maryhill Loops Road | Noon to 2 p.m.
Take a spin past the beautiful scenery and through the historic road’s eight hairpin curves. FREE on the historic Maryhill Loops Road, located just east of US 97 off of State Route 14.

Film Screening: King of Roads | 2 p.m.
King of Roads explores the rich cultural, political and economic forces that prompted the creation and restoration of the historic Columbia River Highway. The film traces the story of the highway from its very beginnings with a gang of dreamers lead by Sam Hill and road engineer Sam Lancaster – two men who lived large lives, and built and spoke poetically – and through the eyes of artists, historians and Gorge residents past and present. The film is directed and produced by Michael Friend and John Hardham, who will be on hand to introduce the film, answer questions and sign the accompanying coffee-table book.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2017

Maryhill Loops Hill Climb | 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Vintage sports cars from the 1930s to 1960s race singly in a three-mile timed climb up the historic Maryhill Loops Road. FREE for spectators viewing the race from the Highway 97 Overlook and from designated viewpoints along the route.

Organized by the Maryhill Loops Vintage Hill Climb Association; only their approved cars and drivers will be competing. This program is assisted by members of the Tri-Cities Strictly British Motor Club; Yakima Valley Sports Car Club and Society of Vintage Racing Enthusiasts.

Car is King Weekend is sponsored by the Goldendale Motor Sports Association, Maryhill Loops Vintage Hill Climb Association, Maryhill Museum of Art, Tri-Cities Strictly British Motor Club, and Yakima Valley Sports Car Club.

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ABOUT MARYHILL MUSEUM OF ART:
Housed in a glorious Beaux Arts mansion on 5,300 acres high above the Columbia River, Maryhill Museum of Art opened to the public May 13, 1940 and today remains one of the Pacific Northwest’s most enchanting cultural destinations. The museum was founded by Northwest entrepreneur and visionary Sam Hill, who purchased the property and began building the house with dreams of establishing a Quaker farming community. When that goal proved untenable, Hill was encouraged by friends Loie Fuller, Queen Marie of Romania, and Alma de Bretteville Spreckles to establish a museum.

Maryhill Museum of Art boasts a world-class permanent collection, rotating exhibitions of the highest caliber, and dynamic educational programs that provide opportunities for further exploration by visitors of all ages. On view are more than 80 works by Auguste Rodin, European and American paintings, objects d’art from the palaces of the Queen of Romania, Orthodox icons, unique chess sets, and the renowned Théâtre de la Mode, featuring small-scale mannequins attired in designer fashions of post-World War II France. Baskets of the indigenous people of North America were a collecting interest of Hill; today the museum’s American Indian collection represents nearly every tradition and style in North America, with works of art from prehistoric through contemporary.

Maryhill’s William and Catherine Dickson Sculpture Park features more than a dozen large-scale works by Northwest artists. The Maryhill Overlook is a site-specific sculpture by noted Portland architect Brad Cloepfil; nearby are Lewis and Clark interpretive panels. Four miles east of Maryhill is a life-sized replica of Stonehenge, Stonehenge Memorial, which Sam Hill built to memorialize local men who perished in World War I. Nearby, the Klickitat County War Memorial honors those who have died in the service of their country since World War I.

The museum was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. In 2001 the museum was listed as an official site of the National Historic Lewis and Clark Trail and in 2002 was accredited by the American Association of Museums. In 2012 the museum opened the Mary and Bruce Stevenson Wing, a 25,500 square foot expansion that is the first in the museum’s history. The new wing boasts the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Education Center, a collections storage and research suite, a new cafe and terrace, and the Cannon Power Plaza with an installation of sculpture, and sweeping views of the Columbia River Gorge and Mount Hood in the distance.

VISITOR INFORMATION:
Maryhill Museum of Art is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., March 15 to November 15. Admission is $9 for adults, $8 for seniors, $3 for youth age 7-18 and free for children 6 and under. Admission to the Stonehenge Memorial is free; it is open from 7:00 a.m. to dusk daily.

Sandwiches, salads, espresso drinks, cold beverages, and freshly baked desserts and pastries, as well as a selection of local wines are available at the museum’s cafe, Loie’s, from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily; the Museum Store features art and history books, jewelry, Native American crafts and other mementos.

Maryhill is located off Highway 97, 12 miles south of Goldendale, Washington. Drive times to the museum are 2 hours from Portland/Vancouver, 3.5 hours from Bend, 4 hours from Seattle, and 1.5 hours from Yakima. For further information, visit maryhillmuseum.org.

Maryhill Museum of Art hosts Pacific Northwest Plein Air in the Columbia River Gorge

(Goldendale, Wash., April 27, 2017) — This summer Maryhill Museum of Art will host the 13th annual Pacific Northwest Plein Air event in the Columbia River Gorge. The event begins July 31 with a four-day plein air paint out, followed by an opening reception Friday, August 4, and an ongoing exhibit through August 27.

Drawing on a long tradition of painting in the open air, this juried event brings together 40 artists to paint the vast, wild beauty of the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, from stunning views of Mt. Hood and the Columbia River to the surrounding vineyards and snowy peaks of the Cascades. Participants include emerging and established artists from the Pacific Northwest and from around the country.

Between July 31 and Aug 3, artists will fan out to paint anywhere in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area; they will also be invited to paint on Maryhill’s grounds, giving museum visitors a unique view of plein air artists at work.

“Thirteen years ago, there were no plein-air events here—none,” says event founder and painter Cathleen Rehfeld Meyers, who lives in the Columbia River Gorge. “That was my idea for starting this event. The area was completely untapped. It’s an amazingly beautiful place, with an incredibly diverse landscape to paint.”

An opening and artist reception will take place Friday, August 4, 2017 from 5 to 7 p.m. at Maryhill Museum of Art, when the public is invited to view and purchase “fresh” paintings and meet the artists. The paintings will remain on view and for sale in the Maryhill’s M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Education Center Maryhill through Sunday, August 27, 2017.

The juror for the 2017 event is painter Michael Hernandez, a California-based plein air artist and sought-after workshop instructor, who will award prizes in 14 categories.

A full list of participating artists is available at www.maryhillmuseum.org/pleinair

July 31 – August 3 | all day
Pacific Northwest Plein Air Paint Out
Artists spend four days painting at various locations throughout the Columbia River Gorge, including on the grounds of Maryhill Museum of Art.

Opening Reception
Friday, August 4 | 5 to
8 p.m.
The public is invited to view the paintings artists created in plein air, meet the artists and enjoy wine and hors d’oeuvres. Artwork will be available for purchase. Awards will be given in a number of categories, including “Best Sky,” “Best Mountain,” “Best Water,” “Historic Columbia River Highway Award,” “Maryhill Museum Award” and a museum purchase award.

The 13th annual Pacific Northwest Plein Air Event in the Columbia River Gorge is made possible by the generosity of Burley Design, Cathedral Ridge Winery, Dakine, David Burbach Photography, Dick Blick Art Materials, Dog River Coffee, Framing Resource, Full Sail Brewing Co., Gamblin Artists Colors, The Griffin House on the Columbia River Gorge, Byron and Sue Henry, Stephen and Laura Muehleck, PleinAir Magazine, RayMar Art Panels, Rosemary & Co. Brushes, and Scottsdale Artists’ School.
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ABOUT MARYHILL:
Housed in a glorious Beaux Arts mansion on 5,300 acres high above the Columbia River, Maryhill Museum of Art opened to the public May 13, 1940 and today remains one of the Pacific Northwest’s most enchanting cultural destinations. The museum was founded by Northwest entrepreneur and visionary Sam Hill, who purchased the property and began building the house with dreams of establishing a Quaker farming community. When that goal proved untenable, Hill was encouraged by friends Loie Fuller, Queen Marie of Romania, and Alma de Bretteville Spreckles to establish a museum.

Maryhill Museum of Art boasts a world-class permanent collection, rotating exhibitions of the highest caliber, and dynamic educational programs that provide opportunities for further exploration by visitors of all ages. On view are more than 80 works by Auguste Rodin, European and American paintings, objects d’art from the palaces of the Queen of Romania, Orthodox icons, unique chess sets, and the renowned Théâtre de la Mode, featuring small-scale mannequins attired in designer fashions of post-World War II France. Baskets of the indigenous people of North America were a collecting interest of Hill; today the museum’s American Indian collection represents nearly every tradition and style in North America, with works of art from prehistoric through contemporary.

Maryhill’s William and Catherine Dickson Sculpture Park features more than a dozen large-scale works by Northwest artists. The Maryhill Overlook is a site-specific sculpture by noted Portland architect Brad Cloepfil; nearby are Lewis and Clark interpretive panels. Four miles east of Maryhill is a life-sized replica of Stonehenge, Stonehenge Memorial, which Sam Hill built to memorialize local men who perished in World War I. Nearby, the Klickitat County War Memorial honors those who have died in the service of their country since World War I.

The museum was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. In 2001 the museum was listed as an official site of the National Historic Lewis and Clark Trail and in 2002 was accredited by the American Association of Museums. In 2012 the museum opened the Mary and Bruce Stevenson Wing, a 25,500 square foot expansion that is the first in the museum’s history. The new wing boasts the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Education Center, a collections storage and research suite, a new cafe and terrace, and the Cannon Power Plaza with an installation of sculpture, and sweeping views of the Columbia River Gorge and Mount Hood in the distance.

VISITOR INFORMATION:
Maryhill Museum of Art is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., March 15 to November 15. Admission is $9 for adults, $8 for seniors, $3 for youth age 7-18 and free for children 6 and under. Admission to the Stonehenge Memorial is free; it is open from 7:00 a.m. to dusk daily.

Sandwiches, salads, espresso drinks, cold beverages, and freshly baked desserts and pastries, as well as a selection of local wines are available at the museum’s cafe, Loie’s, from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily; the Museum Store features art and history books, jewelry, Native American crafts and other mementos.

Maryhill is located off Highway 97, 12 miles south of Goldendale, Washington. Drive times to the museum are 2 hours from Portland/Vancouver, 3.5 hours from Bend, 4 hours from Seattle, and 1.5 hours from Yakima. For further information, visit maryhillmuseum.org.

Two-Day Photography Workshop Shows You How to Take Better Landscapes Using a Camera’s Manual Settings

(March 17, 2017, Goldendale, Wash.,) – Would you like to take better digital photos? An upcoming hands-on photography workshop at Maryhill Museum of Art will show you how to take your camera off auto and learn how to fine-tune your settings to capture beautiful images.

The two-day workshop “Mastering Manual Settings: Digital Photography and the Landscape,” is led by photographer Troy Carpenter, and takes place Sunday, April 2 and Sunday, April 9 at Maryhill. The cost of the workshop is $60 for members of Maryhill Museum of Art / $75 for non-members. To register call 509.773.3733 ext. 25 by March 28 or email education@maryhillmuseum.org.

Participants will meet at Maryhill and fan out to capture the incredible light, landscape and compositional elements of the Gorge. The workshop is appropriate for new and intermediate digital photographers. Coffee and snacks are provided; no-host lunch. Participants should bring their own camera, battery and digital card.

CALENDAR LISTING

Sunday, April 2 & Sunday, April 9, 2017 | 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Mastering Manual Settings: Digital Photography and the Landscape
Join photographer Troy Carpenter, administrator at Goldendale Observatory State Park, for an intensive two-day workshop (over two weekends), designed to increase your knowledge and skill using manual settings. Participants will meet at Maryhill and fan out to capture the incredible light, landscape and compositional elements of the Gorge. The workshop is appropriate for new and intermediate digital photographers.

Cost: $60 members / $75 non-members. Coffee and snacks provided, no-host lunch. Participants should provide their own camera, battery and digital card. To register, call 509.773.3733 ext. 25 by March 28 or email education@maryhillmuseum.org.

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ABOUT MARYHILL MUSEUM OF ART:
Housed in a glorious Beaux Arts mansion on 5,300 acres high above the Columbia River, Maryhill Museum of Art opened to the public May 13, 1940 and today remains one of the Pacific Northwest’s most enchanting cultural destinations. The museum was founded by Northwest entrepreneur and visionary Sam Hill, who purchased the property and began building the house with dreams of establishing a Quaker farming community. When that goal proved untenable, Hill was encouraged by friends Loie Fuller, Queen Marie of Romania, and Alma de Bretteville Spreckles to establish a museum.
Maryhill Museum of Art boasts a world-class permanent collection, rotating exhibitions of the highest caliber, and dynamic educational programs that provide opportunities for further exploration by visitors of all ages. On view are more than 80 works by Auguste Rodin, European and American paintings, objects d’art from the palaces of the Queen of Romania, Orthodox icons, unique chess sets, and the renowned Théâtre de la Mode, featuring small-scale mannequins attired in designer fashions of post-World War II France. Baskets of the indigenous people of North America were a collecting interest of Hill; today the museum’s American Indian collection represents nearly every tradition and style in North America, with works of art from prehistoric through contemporary.

Maryhill’s William and Catherine Dickson Sculpture Park features more than a dozen large-scale works by Northwest artists. The Maryhill Overlook is a site-specific sculpture by noted Portland architect Brad Cloepfil; nearby are Lewis and Clark interpretive panels. Four miles east of Maryhill is a life-sized replica of Stonehenge, Stonehenge Memorial, which Sam Hill built to memorialize local men who perished in World War I. Nearby, the Klickitat County War Memorial honors those who have died in the service of their country since World War I.

The museum was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. In 2001 the museum was listed as an official site of the National Historic Lewis and Clark Trail and in 2002 was accredited by the American Association of Museums. In 2012 the museum opened the Mary and Bruce Stevenson Wing, a 25,500 square foot expansion that is the first in the museum’s history. The new wing boasts the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Education Center, a collections storage and research suite, a new cafe and terrace, and the Cannon Power Plaza with an installation of sculpture, and sweeping views of the Columbia River Gorge and Mount Hood in the distance.

VISITOR INFORMATION:
Maryhill Museum of Art is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., March 15 to November 15. Admission is $9 for adults, $8 for seniors, $3 for youth age 7-18 and free for children 6 and under. Admission to the Stonehenge Memorial is free; it is open from 7:00 a.m. to dusk daily.Sandwiches, salads, espresso drinks, cold beverages, and freshly baked desserts and pastries, as well as a selection of local wines are available at the museum’s cafe, Loie’s, from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily; the Museum Store features art and history books, jewelry, Native American crafts and other mementos.

Maryhill is located off Highway 97, 12 miles south of Goldendale, Washington. Drive times to the museum are 2 hours from Portland/Vancouver, 3.5 hours from Bend, 4 hours from Seattle, and 1.5 hours from Yakima. For further information, visit maryhillmuseum.org.

Maryhill Museum of Art Announces Access Program for Low-Income Families

(GOLDENDALE, Wash., March 6, 2017) – Maryhill Museum of Art is pleased to announce that it has joined Museums for All, a signature access program of the Association of Children’s Museums (ACM) and the Institute of Museum and Library Services(IMLS). The program enables low-income families to visit Maryhill Museum of Art for a reduced rate of $2 per person with the presentation of an Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) card.

The primary goal of Museums for All is to encourage families of all backgrounds to visit museums regularly and build lifelong appreciation for museums.

Museums for All dovetails with Maryhill’s broad commitment to seek, include, and welcome everyone,” says Colleen Schafroth, Maryhill’s executive director. “We are thrilled to offer this discount to our neighbors, and hope low income families in the region will be able to visit the museum and take advantage of the valuable learning resources available here.”

In addition to Museums for All, Maryhill offers several other discounted and free admission programs. Details are available at www.maryhillmuseum.org/visit/hours-admissions/special-admission-programs.

In addition to special and permanent exhibitions, Maryhill offers a wide range of educational programs including lectures, workshops, family days, and other special events. For more information, visit www.maryhillmuseum.org.

Maryhill Museum of Art opens for the season on March 15, 2017; museum hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily from March 15 – November 15.

MEDIA: High resolution images of the museum are available for immediate download. Click here.

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ABOUT MARYHILL MUSEUM OF ART:
Housed in a glorious Beaux Arts mansion on 5,300 acres high above the Columbia River, Maryhill Museum of Art opened to the public May 13, 1940 and today remains one of the Pacific Northwest’s most enchanting cultural destinations. The museum was founded by Northwest entrepreneur and visionary Sam Hill, who purchased the property and began building the house with dreams of establishing a Quaker farming community. When that goal proved untenable, Hill was encouraged by friends Loie Fuller, Queen Marie of Romania, and Alma de Bretteville Spreckles to establish a museum.
Maryhill Museum of Art boasts a world-class permanent collection, rotating exhibitions of the highest caliber, and dynamic educational programs that provide opportunities for further exploration by visitors of all ages. On view are more than 80 works by Auguste Rodin, European and American paintings, objects d’art from the palaces of the Queen of Romania, Orthodox icons, unique chess sets, and the renowned Théâtre de la Mode, featuring small-scale mannequins attired in designer fashions of post-World War II France. Baskets of the indigenous people of North America were a collecting interest of Hill; today the museum’s American Indian collection represents nearly every tradition and style in North America, with works of art from prehistoric through contemporary.

Maryhill’s William and Catherine Dickson Sculpture Park features more than a dozen large-scale works by Northwest artists. The Maryhill Overlook is a site-specific sculpture by noted Portland architect Brad Cloepfil; nearby are Lewis and Clark interpretive panels. Four miles east of Maryhill is a life-sized replica of Stonehenge, Stonehenge Memorial, which Sam Hill built to memorialize local men who perished in World War I. Nearby, the Klickitat County War Memorial honors those who have died in the service of their country since World War I.

The museum was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. In 2001 the museum was listed as an official site of the National Historic Lewis and Clark Trail and in 2002 was accredited by the American Association of Museums. In 2012 the museum opened the Mary and Bruce Stevenson Wing, a 25,500 square foot expansion that is the first in the museum’s history. The new wing boasts the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Education Center, a collections storage and research suite, a new cafe and terrace, and the Cannon Power Plaza with an installation of sculpture, and sweeping views of the Columbia River Gorge and Mount Hood in the distance.

VISITOR INFORMATION:
Maryhill Museum of Art is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., March 15 to November 15. Admission is $9 for adults, $8 for seniors, $3 for youth age 7-18 and free for children 6 and under. Admission to the Stonehenge Memorial is free; it is open from 7:00 a.m. to dusk daily.Sandwiches, salads, espresso drinks, cold beverages, and freshly baked desserts and pastries, as well as a selection of local wines are available at the museum’s cafe, Loie’s, from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily; the Museum Store features art and history books, jewelry, Native American crafts and other mementos.

Maryhill is located off Highway 97, 12 miles south of Goldendale, Washington. Drive times to the museum are 2 hours from Portland/Vancouver, 3.5 hours from Bend, 4 hours from Seattle, and 1.5 hours from Yakima. For further information, visit maryhillmuseum.org.

ABOUT THE INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES
The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 17,500 museums. Our mission is to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement. Our grant making, policy development, and research help libraries and museums deliver valuable services that make it possible for communities and individuals to thrive. To learn more, visit www.imls.gov and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

ABOUT THE ASSOCIATION OF CHILDREN’S MUSEUMS (ACM)
In an increasingly complex world, children’s museums provide a 
place where all kids can learn through play and exploration with the caring adults in their lives. There are approximately 400 children’s museums around the world, which annually reach more than 31 million visitors. ACM provides leadership, professional development, advocacy and resources for its member organizations and individuals. To learn more about ACM and to find an ACM-member children’s museum near you, visit www.ChildrensMuseums.org

New Acquisitions, Greek Ceramics and the American West highlighted during Maryhill’s 2017 Season

(GOLDENDALE, Wash., January 11, 2017) – Maryhill Museum of Art will re-open for the season on March 15, 2017 with a special exhibition featuring recent additions to the museum’s collection. The exhibition Something for Everyone: New Treasures from the Permanent Collection, features works added to the museum’s holdings since 2010, including Romanian folk clothing, American Indian baskets and beadwork, medieval illuminated manuscripts, art glass, and sculpture, paintings and prints by Northwest artists Lillian Pitt, Rick Bartow and Betty LaDuke.

A Season-Opening Celebration will be held on Saturday, March 18, 2017. From 2 to 5 p.m., visitors are invited to take part in guided gallery talks, along with roof-top tours of the museum and its recent stucco restoration. These activities are free with museum admission. An evening Members’ Party from 5 to 8 p.m. will include regional wines, generous hors d’oeuvres, dancing and live music. Tickets for the Members’ Party are $35/ museum members and $45/ non-members; to purchase tickets for the Members’ Party, call 509-773-3733, ext. 20.

Throughout 2017, visitors will also be able to enjoy smaller exhibitions of ancient Greek ceramics, paintings, sculptures and photographs depicting the American West, and a new rotation in the museum’s popular Théâtre de la Mode exhibition of post-WWII French haute couture fashions.

Maryhill’s exhibitions are accompanied by a wealth of related programming for adults and families. For more information on programs, including lectures, hands-on art workshops and special events visit the calendar of events at www.maryhillmuseum.org.


SPECIAL EXHBITIONS IN 2017
March 15–November 15, 2017
Something for Everyone: New Treasures from the Permanent Collection

The genesis of Maryhill Museum of Art’s permanent collection was a gift from Queen Marie of Romania during her 1926 visit to dedicate the museum. Since that time, the collection has expanded tremendously, with particular growth since 2010. The exhibition includes a fascinating array of newly acquired works, including Romanian folk clothing, American Indian baskets and beadwork, half-size French and American fashions, medieval illuminated manuscripts, art glass, as well as sculpture, paintings and prints by artists Lillian Pitt, Rick Bartow, Betty LaDuke, Fritz Scholder, R.H. Ives Gammell and others.
March 15–November 15, 2017
Théâtre de la Mode

A new rotation of Théâtre de la Mode sets and their accompanying fashion mannequins will go on view in 2017: Jean Cocteau’s “My Wife is a Witch,” Jean Saint Martin’s “Paris Sketch” and Anne Surger’s “Street Scene.”
March 15–November 15, 2017
Ancient Greek Ceramics from the Permanent Collection

In 1926, Queen Marie of Romania’s oldest daughter, Elisabetha, the former Queen Consort of Greece, gave to Maryhill Museum of Art a collection of terracotta Tanagra figures and ancient Greek pottery vessels. Tanagras are figurines that were rediscovered near the Beotian town of Tanagra, (central Greece) in the 1870s. They are made of mold-cast terracotta and were produced after the late 4th century A.D. The amphorae and related ceramic vessels are mostly from Cyprus and date from the Iron Age to the Early Roman Period (c. 1050 B.C.E.–50 A.D.).
March 15–November 15, 2017
Maryhill Favorites: The Western Experience

Paintings, photographs and sculptures from Maryhill’s collection showing all aspects of the American West, including cowboy, Indian, wildlife and Western landscape subjects. Featured artists include Edward Curtis, John Fery, Alfred Lenz, Eanger Irving Couse, Edward Burns Quigley and Charles Marion Russell.
March 15–November 15, 2017
Sam Hill and the Columbia River Highway

Black and white prints showing both construction photos of the highway and early scenic views of the Columbia River Gorge. Most of the images are drawn from Sam Hill’s personal photo collection, which is housed at Maryhill Museum of Art.
Native American Gallery Update
The museum’s Native People of North America gallery will see another update in 2017, with the installation of newly acquired textiles, beadwork and pottery from Apache, Navajo and Pueblo Indians.
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ABOUT MARYHILL MUSEUM OF ART:
Housed in a glorious Beaux Arts mansion on 5,300 acres high above the Columbia River, Maryhill Museum of Art opened to the public May 13, 1940 and today remains one of the Pacific Northwest’s most enchanting cultural destinations. The museum was founded by Northwest entrepreneur and visionary Sam Hill, who purchased the property and began building the house with dreams of establishing a Quaker farming community. When that goal proved untenable, Hill was encouraged by friends Loie Fuller, Queen Marie of Romania, and Alma de Bretteville Spreckles to establish a museum.

Maryhill Museum of Art boasts a world-class permanent collection, rotating exhibitions of the highest caliber, and dynamic educational programs that provide opportunities for further exploration by visitors of all ages. On view are more than 80 works by Auguste Rodin, European and American paintings, objects d’art from the palaces of the Queen of Romania, Orthodox icons, unique chess sets, and the renowned Théâtre de la Mode, featuring small-scale mannequins attired in designer fashions of post-World War II France. Baskets of the indigenous people of North America were a collecting interest of Hill; today the museum’s American Indian collection represents nearly every tradition and style in North America, with works of art from prehistoric through contemporary.

Maryhill’s William and Catherine Dickson Sculpture Park features more than a dozen large-scale works by Northwest artists. The Maryhill Overlook is a site-specific sculpture by noted Portland architect Brad Cloepfil; nearby are Lewis and Clark interpretive panels. Four miles east of Maryhill is a life-sized replica of Stonehenge, Stonehenge Memorial, which Sam Hill built to memorialize local men who perished in World War I. Nearby, the Klickitat County War Memorial honors those who have died in the service of their country since World War I.

The museum was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. In 2001 the museum was listed as an official site of the National Historic Lewis and Clark Trail and in 2002 was accredited by the American Association of Museums. In 2012 the museum opened the Mary and Bruce Stevenson Wing, a 25,500 square foot expansion that is the first in the museum’s history. The new wing boasts the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Education Center, a collections storage and research suite, a new cafe and terrace, and the Cannon Power Plaza with an installation of sculpture, and sweeping views of the Columbia River Gorge and Mount Hood in the distance.

VISITOR INFORMATION:
Maryhill Museum of Art is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., March 15 to November 15. Admission is $9 for adults, $8 for seniors, $3 for youth age 7-18 and free for children 6 and under. Admission to the Stonehenge Memorial is free; it is open from 7:00 a.m. to dusk daily.

Sandwiches, salads, espresso drinks, cold beverages, and freshly baked desserts and pastries, as well as a selection of local wines are available at the museum’s cafe, Loie’s, from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily; the Museum Store features art and history books, jewelry, Native American crafts and other mementos.

Maryhill is located off Highway 97, 12 miles south of Goldendale, Washington. Drive times to the museum are 2 hours from Portland/Vancouver, 3.5 hours from Bend, 4 hours from Seattle, and 1.5 hours from Yakima. For further information, visit maryhillmuseum.org.

Maryhill Museum of Art hosts Pacific Northwest Plein Air in the Columbia River Gorge

(GOLDENDALE, Wash., May 9, 2016) – Maryhill Museum of Art will host the 12th annual Pacific Northwest Plein Air Event in the Columbia River Gorge, to be held August 22-28, 2016. Drawing on a long tradition of painting in the open air, this juried event attracts some of the finest painters from the Pacific Northwest, and from across the country, to capture the stunning light and inspiring vistas of the Columbia River Gorge.

The 40 participating artists will spend the first four days of the event painting in various locations throughout the Gorge; an opening and artist reception will take place Friday, August 26, 2016 from 5 to 7 p.m. at Maryhill Museum of Art, when the public is invited to view and purchase “fresh” paintings and meet the artists. The paintings will remain on view at Maryhill through Sunday, August 28, 2016.

“I am delighted the museum is able to host this wonderful event,” said Colleen Schafroth, executive director of Maryhill Museum of Art. “One of the things that makes Maryhill so magical is the setting; the Pacific Northwest Plein Air Event celebrates the landscape that we call home and gives the public a fantastic opportunity to view the Gorge – from the river and plateaus, to the surrounding peaks – through the eyes of 40 talented artists.”

The Juror for the Pacific Northwest Plein Air Event in 2016 is painter Terry Miura, who began his career in New York as a successful illustrator, with work appearing in such publications as Time, Newsweek, Rolling Stone, and Sports Illustrated. Miura transitioned to a full-time painter after returning to the West Coast in 1996, and is well known for his atmospheric landscapes and cityscapes, as well as evocative figurative works. Miura’s paintings are held in numerous private and public collections, including California Museum of Fine Art, Los Angeles, Calif., The Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento, Calif., and the New School for Social Research in New York City, among others. Miura lives outside of Sacramento, California.

A full list of participating artists is available at www.maryhillmuseum.org/2016-plein-air-event.

Related Events:

Opening Reception
Friday, August 26 | 5 to 7 p.m.
The public is invited to view the paintings artists created in plein air, meet the artists and enjoy wine and hors d’oeuvres. Artwork will be available for purchase. Awards will be given in a number of categories, including “Best Sky,” “Best Mountain,” “Best Water,” “Historic Columbia River Highway Award,” “Maryhill Museum Award,” and a purchase award.

Plein Air Workshop with Terry Miura
Saturday, August 27 | 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Spend the day working with painter and 2016 PNW Plein Air Event juror Terry Miura. Each student is expected to bring their own easel (plein air set-up) and supplies (confirmation and supply list will be emailed upon registration). Please contact Terry Miura directly for registration and payment at http://www.terrymiura.com.

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ABOUT MARYHILL MUSEUM OF ART:
Housed in a glorious Beaux Arts mansion on 5,300 acres high above the Columbia River, Maryhill Museum of Art opened to the public May 13, 1940 and today remains one of the Pacific Northwest’s most enchanting cultural destinations. The museum was founded by Northwest entrepreneur and visionary Sam Hill, who purchased the property and began building the house with dreams of establishing a Quaker farming community. When that goal proved untenable, Hill was encouraged by friends Loie Fuller, Queen Marie of Romania, and Alma de Bretteville Spreckles to establish a museum.

Maryhill Museum of Art boasts a world-class permanent collection, rotating exhibitions of the highest caliber, and dynamic educational programs that provide opportunities for further exploration by visitors of all ages. On view are more than 80 works by Auguste Rodin, European and American paintings, objects d’art from the palaces of the Queen of Romania, Orthodox icons, unique chess sets, and the renowned Théâtre de la Mode, featuring small-scale mannequins attired in designer fashions of post-World War II France. Baskets of the indigenous people of North America were a collecting interest of Hill; today the museum’s American Indian collection represents nearly every tradition and style in North America, with works of art from prehistoric through contemporary.  

Maryhill’s William and Catherine Dickson Sculpture Park features more than a dozen large-scale works by Northwest artists. The Maryhill Overlook is a site-specific sculpture by noted Portland architect Brad Cloepfil; nearby are Lewis and Clark interpretive panels. Four miles east of Maryhill is a life-sized replica of Stonehenge, Stonehenge Memorial, which Sam Hill built to memorialize local men who perished in World War I. Nearby, the Klickitat County War Memorial honors those who have died in the service of their country since World War I.

The museum was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. In 2001 the museum was listed as an official site of the National Historic Lewis and Clark Trail and in 2002 was accredited by the American Association of Museums. In 2012 the museum opened the Mary and Bruce Stevenson Wing, a 25,500 square foot expansion that is the first in the museum’s history. The new wing boasts the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Education Center, a collections storage and research suite, a new cafe and terrace, and the Cannon Power Plaza with an installation of sculpture, and sweeping views of the Columbia River Gorge and Mount Hood in the distance.

VISITOR INFORMATION:
Maryhill Museum of Art is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., March 15 to November 15. Admission is $9 for adults, $8 for seniors, $3 for youth age 7-18 and free for children 6 and under. Admission to the Stonehenge Memorial is free; it is open from 7:00 a.m. to dusk daily.

Sandwiches, salads, espresso drinks, cold beverages, and freshly baked desserts and pastries, as well as a selection of local wines are available at the museum’s cafe, Loie’s, from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily; the Museum Store features art and history books, jewelry, Native American crafts and other mementos.

Maryhill is located off Highway 97, 12 miles south of Goldendale, Washington. Drive times to the museum are 2 hours from Portland/Vancouver, 3.5 hours from Bend, 4 hours from Seattle, and 1.5 hours from Yakima. For further information, visit maryhillmuseum.org.

 

Maryhill Celebrates Romanian Ties During May 21 Festival

(Goldendale, Wash., May 6, 2016) – Maryhill Museum of Art will commemorate a royal visit on May 21 during its annual Member Appreciation Day, where the centerpiece will be a Romanian Arts & Culture Festival. Admission to the museum will be free on May 21.

The festival, which will take place from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., will include performances pop singer / songwriter Abigail Budak from Sacramento, traditional dance and music by Datina Folk Ensemble from Seattle, and the St. Mary’s Romanian Church Children’s Dance Group from Portland.

“A Taste of Romania” will give visitors a chance to sample traditional Romanian fare; the museum café will also be open for those who wish to purchase a meal. Activities for children will also be offered.

The festival is sponsored and presented by the Romanian American Society and the Romanian community. George Cristian Maior, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Romania to the United States, will be a special guest during the event.

In 1926, Queen Marie of Romania visited Maryhill, causing quite a buzz in the Columbia River Gorge. The royal visit attracted a crowd of 2,000, including 400 area schoolchildren and an auto caravan from Portland. She came to dedicate the yet-unfinished Maryhill Museum of Art as a personal favor to her dear friend Sam Hill, and to deliver a cache of artwork and personal artifacts that would enthrall visitors for decades to come. Marie brought paintings and sculptures, along with carved furniture, manuscripts, and the gown she wore to the 1896 coronation of her cousins Tsar Nicholas II and Tsarina Alexandra of Russia. All of these objects can be seen at Maryhill today.

“Queen Marie anchored a piece of Romania’s heart and tradition here in the Pacific Northwest, where many Romanians now find themselves living, growing and contributing as a Romanian-American community” said Michael Oros, President of the Romanian American Society and a member of Maryhill’s Board of Trustees. “Queen Marie was a Queen of the people – she truly embraced in her heart the place, the people and the traditions of Romania; on this occasion we celebrate and share those very traditions here in the Northwest.”

MAY 21 EVENT SCHEDULE

Annual Meeting of the Membership, 10 a.m.
Curious about what’s going on at the museum? Join us as we fill you in on all the wonderful things we are doing at Maryhill; we’ll also share some of our plans for the future. FREE with museum admission.

Romanian Arts & Culture Festival, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Experience the art and culture of Romania, both contemporary and traditional. The festival opens with a kickoff that will include anthems and the introductions of guests. This will be followed by Romanian performances throughout the day that include Romanian pop singer and songwriter Abigail Budak from Sacramento and the traditional dance and music by Datina Folk Ensemble from Seattle and the St. Mary’s Romanian Church Children’s Dance Group from Portland.

Special activities for children and Romanian food are also part of the fun. A Romanian food sampler will include cabbage rolls, Romanian bread and a selection of desserts. (This free taste is not meant to be a meal; the museum’s café will be open for food service from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.)

Special Guest is George Cristian Maior, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Romania to the United States. Sponsored and presented by the Romanian American Society and the Romanian community. A full schedule of the activities will be posted at www.maryhillmuseum.org.

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ABOUT MARYHILL MUSEUM OF ART:
Housed in a glorious Beaux Arts mansion on 5,300 acres high above the Columbia River, Maryhill Museum of Art opened to the public May 13, 1940 and today remains one of the Pacific Northwest’s most enchanting cultural destinations. The museum was founded by Northwest entrepreneur and visionary Sam Hill, who purchased the property and began building the house with dreams of establishing a Quaker farming community. When that goal proved untenable, Hill was encouraged by friends Loie Fuller, Queen Marie of Romania, and Alma de Bretteville Spreckles to establish a museum.

Maryhill Museum of Art boasts a world-class permanent collection, rotating exhibitions of the highest caliber, and dynamic educational programs that provide opportunities for further exploration by visitors of all ages. On view are more than 80 works by Auguste Rodin, European and American paintings, objects d’art from the palaces of the Queen of Romania, Orthodox icons, unique chess sets, and the renowned Théâtre de la Mode, featuring small-scale mannequins attired in designer fashions of post-World War II France. Baskets of the indigenous people of North America were a collecting interest of Hill; today the museum’s American Indian collection represents nearly every tradition and style in North America, with works of art from prehistoric through contemporary.

Maryhill’s William and Catherine Dickson Sculpture Park features more than a dozen large-scale works by Northwest artists. The Maryhill Overlook is a site-specific sculpture by noted Portland architect Brad Cloepfil; nearby are Lewis and Clark interpretive panels. Four miles east of Maryhill is a life-sized replica of Stonehenge, Stonehenge Memorial, which Sam Hill built to memorialize local men who perished in World War I. Nearby, the Klickitat County War Memorial honors those who have died in the service of their country since World War I.

The museum was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. In 2001 the museum was listed as an official site of the National Historic Lewis and Clark Trail and in 2002 was accredited by the American Association of Museums. In 2012 the museum opened the Mary and Bruce Stevenson Wing, a 25,500 square foot expansion that is the first in the museum’s history. The new wing boasts the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Education Center, a collections storage and research suite, a new cafe and terrace, and the Cannon Power Plaza with an installation of sculpture, and sweeping views of the Columbia River Gorge and Mount Hood in the distance.


VISITOR INFORMATION:

Maryhill Museum of Art is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., March 15 to November 15. Admission is $9 for adults, $8 for seniors, $3 for youth age 7-18 and free for children 6 and under. Admission to the Stonehenge Memorial is free; it is open from 7:00 a.m. to dusk daily.

Sandwiches, salads, espresso drinks, cold beverages, and freshly baked desserts and pastries, as well as a selection of local wines are available at the museum’s cafe, Loie’s, from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily; the Museum Store features art and history books, jewelry, Native American crafts and other mementos.

Maryhill is located off Highway 97, 12 miles south of Goldendale, Washington. Drive times to the museum are 2 hours from Portland/Vancouver, 3.5 hours from Bend, 4 hours from Seattle, and 1.5 hours from Yakima. For further information, visit maryhillmuseum.org.

ABOUT MARYHILL MUSEUM OF ART:
Housed in a glorious Beaux Arts mansion on 5,300 acres high above the Columbia River, Maryhill Museum of Art opened to the public May 13, 1940 and today remains one of the Pacific Northwest’s most enchanting cultural destinations. The museum was founded by Northwest entrepreneur and visionary Sam Hill, who purchased the property and began building the house with dreams of establishing a Quaker farming community. When that goal proved untenable, Hill was encouraged by friends Loie Fuller, Queen Marie of Romania, and Alma de Bretteville Spreckles to establish a museum.

Maryhill Museum of Art boasts a world-class permanent collection, rotating exhibitions of the highest caliber, and dynamic educational programs that provide opportunities for further exploration by visitors of all ages. On view are more than 80 works by Auguste Rodin, European and American paintings, objects d’art from the palaces of the Queen of Romania, Orthodox icons, unique chess sets, and the renowned Théâtre de la Mode, featuring small-scale mannequins attired in designer fashions of post-World War II France. Baskets of the indigenous people of North America were a collecting interest of Hill; today the museum’s American Indian collection represents nearly every tradition and style in North America, with works of art from prehistoric through contemporary.  

Maryhill’s William and Catherine Dickson Sculpture Park features more than a dozen large-scale works by Northwest artists. The Maryhill Overlook is a site-specific sculpture by noted Portland architect Brad Cloepfil; nearby are Lewis and Clark interpretive panels. Four miles east of Maryhill is a life-sized replica of Stonehenge, Stonehenge Memorial, which Sam Hill built to memorialize local men who perished in World War I. Nearby, the Klickitat County War Memorial honors those who have died in the service of their country since World War I.

The museum was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. In 2001 the museum was listed as an official site of the National Historic Lewis and Clark Trail and in 2002 was accredited by the American Association of Museums. In 2012 the museum opened the Mary and Bruce Stevenson Wing, a 25,500 square foot expansion that is the first in the museum’s history. The new wing boasts the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Education Center, a collections storage and research suite, a new cafe and terrace, and the Cannon Power Plaza with an installation of sculpture, and sweeping views of the Columbia River Gorge and Mount Hood in the distance.

Colorful American Indian Trade Blankets Opens July 16

(GOLDENDALE, Wash., April 22, 2016) –  A Kaleidoscope of Color: American Indian Trade Blankets will be on view at Maryhill Museum of Art July 16 – November 15, 2016. The exhibition will explore commercially produced trade blankets as an important facet of Indian culture, showcasing 20 pre-1925 blankets from well-known historic manufacturers such as Buell Manufacturing Company, J. Capps & Sons, Racine Woolen Mills, Oregon City Woolen Mills, and Pendleton Woolen Mills. The featured blankets are from private collections and offer a rare opportunity to see some of the most colorful items ever created by American industrial designers.

A Brief History of Trade Blankets
Historically, North America’s Native peoples fashioned warm wearing robes from woven cotton, yucca, feathers or rabbit skins, or from tanned elk and buffalo hide. Trade blankets made by outsiders first appeared on the continent in the 18th century, when the Hudson’s Bay Company imported English “point” blankets. From 1780 to 1890, these blankets were a staple of the fur trade, especially in Canada and the northern tier states.

During the same period, Navajo weavers were well known for their fine wearing blankets. But with the arrival of trading posts at the end of the 19th century, traders encouraged Navajo customers to focus on the production of rugs for sale to distant markets; this advice, coupled with reservation constraints that limited Native access to the materials needed to create their own blankets, Navajo weavers largely stopped making blankets. Enterprising American woolen mills saw an opportunity and began producing brightly-colored blankets with bold geometric designs for sale to the Native populace. These trade blankets soon became an important part of Native culture and for general household use.

Although Indian trade blankets are synonymous with 20th-century reservation style, manufacturers were dependent on sales to the non-Native population. Instead of transferring specific Native designs onto blankets, they created patterns that appealed to mainstream romantic stereotypes of Indian imagery and specific pattern names were assigned because of their lyrical quality rather than any relationship to objective origins.

Trade blanket aficionados favor blankets made prior to 1942 – the year mills began manufacturing for the war effort. The majority of vintage robes still in circulation come from non-Native families as Indian people took great pride in their blankets and generally used them until they were worn out. Others were valued as burial attire and the practice of wrapping departed relatives in a new Pendleton blanket is still common in Navajo communities.

Related Programs:
Lecture: “I See by Your Outfit…” : Clothing in Personal and Community Identity
Thursday, July 21 | 7 p.m.

Maryhill’s Curator of Art Steve Grafe discusses clothing as a means of individual, cultural, political, and social identity and expression. Visitors can explore the museum’s haute couture fashions in the Théâtre de la Mode exhibition, Native American and arctic textiles, and more. Cost: FREE museum members / $5 non-members.

Lecture & Appraisals: Barry Friedman’s Walkin’ Talkin’ Indian Trade Blanket Lecture
Saturday, October 15 | 2 p.m.

Join author and antique American Indian trade and camp blankets specialist Barry Friedman for a walk through the exhibition. Friedman has written two books on the subject: Chasing Rainbows: Collecting American Indian Trade & Camp Blankets (2003) and Still Chasing Rainbows: Collecting American Indian Trade & Camp Blankets, Volume Two (2014), serves as vintage blanket consultant to Pendleton Woolen Mills and is a vintage blanket supplier to Ralph Lauren. After the exhibition walkthrough, Friedman will appraise visitors’ own trade blankets. FREE with museum admission.

Hi-res images for media use are available here. For further information, please contact Rachel Bucci at rachel@maryhillmuseum.org

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ABOUT MARYHILL MUSEUM OF ART:
Housed in a glorious Beaux Arts mansion on 5,300 acres high above the Columbia River, Maryhill Museum of Art opened to the public May 13, 1940 and today remains one of the Pacific Northwest’s most enchanting cultural destinations. The museum was founded by Northwest entrepreneur and visionary Sam Hill, who purchased the property and began building the house with dreams of establishing a Quaker farming community. When that goal proved untenable, Hill was encouraged by friends Loie Fuller, Queen Marie of Romania, and Alma de Bretteville Spreckles to establish a museum.

Maryhill Museum of Art boasts a world-class permanent collection, rotating exhibitions of the highest caliber, and dynamic educational programs that provide opportunities for further exploration by visitors of all ages. On view are more than 80 works by Auguste Rodin, European and American paintings, objects d’art from the palaces of the Queen of Romania, Orthodox icons, unique chess sets, and the renowned Théâtre de la Mode, featuring small-scale mannequins attired in designer fashions of post-World War II France. Baskets of the indigenous people of North America were a collecting interest of Hill; today the museum’s American Indian collection represents nearly every tradition and style in North America, with works of art from prehistoric through contemporary.  

Maryhill’s William and Catherine Dickson Sculpture Park features more than a dozen large-scale works by Northwest artists. The Maryhill Overlook is a site-specific sculpture by noted Portland architect Brad Cloepfil; nearby are Lewis and Clark interpretive panels. Four miles east of Maryhill is a life-sized replica of Stonehenge, Stonehenge Memorial, which Sam Hill built to memorialize local men who perished in World War I. Nearby, the Klickitat County War Memorial honors those who have died in the service of their country since World War I.

The museum was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. In 2001 the museum was listed as an official site of the National Historic Lewis and Clark Trail and in 2002 was accredited by the American Association of Museums. In 2012 the museum opened the Mary and Bruce Stevenson Wing, a 25,500 square foot expansion that is the first in the museum’s history. The new wing boasts the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Education Center, a collections storage and research suite, a new cafe and terrace, and the Cannon Power Plaza with an installation of sculpture, and sweeping views of the Columbia River Gorge and Mount Hood in the distance.

VISITOR INFORMATION:
Maryhill Museum of Art is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., March 15 to November 15. Admission is $9 for adults, $8 for seniors, $3 for youth age 7-18 and free for children 6 and under. Admission to the Stonehenge Memorial is free; it is open from 7:00 a.m. to dusk daily.

Sandwiches, salads, espresso drinks, cold beverages, and freshly baked desserts and pastries, as well as a selection of local wines are available at the museum’s cafe, Loie’s, from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily; the Museum Store features art and history books, jewelry, Native American crafts and other mementos.

Maryhill is located off Highway 97, 12 miles south of Goldendale, Washington. Drive times to the museum are 2 hours from Portland/Vancouver, 3.5 hours from Bend, 4 hours from Seattle, and 1.5 hours from Yakima. For further information, visit maryhillmuseum.org.

Image above: Oregon City Woolen Mills (Oregon City, OR, 1864–1932), Happy Hunting Ground blanket, c. 1920s, Wool, 72” x 60; Private Collection